The 10 Best Sketches from I Think You Should Leave with Tim Robinson

If you have yet to watch Netflix’s latest and greatest sketch comedy show, Saturday Night Live alum Tim Robinson’s I Think You Should Leave, might we ask what you are doing? The Lonely Island-produced six-episode series, which debuted on April 23, is already bordering on cult-hit status, and if your friends and family failed you by neglecting to tell you of its goodness, then allow us to … succeed you. (Words are hard.)

Part of I Think You Should Leave’s charm is the unpredictability with which its sketches, initially appearing to be one thing, actually turn out to be another altogether. So if you have yet to see the show, you might want to go do that—it’s streaming on Netflix right this moment, with an average episode length of about 16 minutes, so you can finish it in under two hours, and our words will still be here when you get back—lest we spoil some of the fun for you.

If you have seen the show, then you know Robinson’s subject of choice: “People not wanting to be publicly embarrassed but also not wanting to admit that they’ve made a small mistake, and then taking it so far that it becomes a much bigger problem for them,” as he put it to us. The lengths these people go to range from screaming like a baby on a plane to eating a gift receipt, and we love them, these lengths.

Here are the words about I Think You Should Leave and the best of its sketches, which are all pretty best, really.

10. The Man ft. Will Forte

True Event: Based on the kidnappings of the undertaker H.D. Darby and his acquaintance Sophia Stone, near Ruston, Louisiana on April 27, 1933.


3. Dog Day Afternoon (1975)

 

Storyline: A man robs a bank to pay for his lover’s operation; it turns into a hostage situation and a media circus.

True Event: Based on P.F. Kluge’s article “The Boys in the Bank,” which tells a similar story of the robbery of a Brooklyn bank by John Wojtowicz and Salvatore Naturale on August 22, 1972.


4. Bandits (2001)

 

Storyline: Two bank robbers fall in love with the girl they’ve kidnapped.

True Event: Based (loosely) on real life bank robbers Terry Lee Connor and Joseph Daugherty. Many elements of their heists are accurately depicted in this film, including breaking into the home of a bank manager and giving soda to one of their victims.


5. The Bank Job (2008)

 

Storyline: Martine offers Terry a lead on a foolproof bank hit on London’s Baker Street. But Terry and his crew don’t realize the boxes also contain a treasure trove of dirty secrets.

True Event: Based on the 1971 Baker Street robbery in central London, from which the money and valuables were stolen, never recovered.


6. Public Enemies (2009)

 

Storyline: The Feds try to take down notorious American gangsters John Dillinger, Baby Face Nelson and Pretty Boy Floyd during a booming crime wave in the 1930s.

True Event: Based on the notorious bank robber John Dillinger as he is pursued by FBI agent Melvin Purvis and Dillinger’s relationship with Billie Frechette.


This list is arranged chronologically if you know any other good bank robbery movies based on actual events and stories, moreover, if you think this film deserves to be on this list then kindly let us know in the comments below.

10 Movies Based on Real Life Travel Adventures

  Travel is a science. Travel is a profession. Travel is also an art. What better way to express this art than in a motion picture?

We at Holidify are huge movie buffs. When we aren’t travelling or working hard to get you the best travel experience, we like to sit back and relax with a good movie or two. Nice films always leave us wondering, “What if this had actually happened?”, so we decided to narrow down our choices to our two favourite categories and combined them into one – Travel Movies based on Real Life Experiences.

Here are the 10 Travel Movies Based on True Events:

1. Into the Wild

Into the Wild (Source)

Christopher McCandless was a college graduate who decided to abandon all his possessions and get as far away as possible from the impending career rat-race to search for himself in America’s wilderness. Christening his new self as Alexander Supertramp, he hiked and hitchhiked his way through the country and even to Mexico, before ultimately wandering to Alaska with meager supplies. The mini-bus in which he passed away till date remains perched along the Stampede Trail in Denali Borough, Alaska.

Directed by Sean Penn, the movie beautifully retraces the real life adventure. Just watching it once won’t be enough – at least it wasn’t for me! Especially for college students, as the pressure of graduation, getting a job and starting a career builds up, abandoning it all to travel the world seems like an attractive alternative. Not everyone can choose the road less travelled but those who do never look back.

Even though the movie doesn’t have a typical happy ending, it gives you a new set of eyes to see the world through. We all have an Alexander Supertramp inside of us – why are we afraid of setting him free?

Lessons learnt from the movie: ALWAYS carry enough food on you and never eat wild berries.

2. The Way Back

The Way Back (Source)

Starring Jim Sturgess, Ed Harris and Colin Farrel, The Way Back narrates the story of three men who escaped from a Siberian Gulag and managed to reach India after travelling for 4,000 miles on foot.

The freezing nights, lack of food and water, mosquitoes, an endless desert, and the Himalayas with shots overlooking parts of Russia, Mongolia, Tibet, and India – just help you realize the vastness of the journey and what the real life protagonists must have been through.

The Way Back is a beautiful movie that showcases a truly incredible journey.

3. Tracks

Tracks (Source)

The movie is based on the real life journey of Robyn Davidson, a young Brisbane woman, who goes on a 1,700-mile trek across the West Australian desert. Her four camels and a faithful dog (Diggity) are all she has to keep her company, apart from a few visits from her photographer friend Rick.

It took Robyn 157 days to complete her mammoth journey and the end of the desert led her to the glorious ocean. The youngest camel of the lot was the first one to step into the waters of the azure sea. This scene is the defining moment of the movie and Robyn’s expedition. The movie is based on the autobiography written by the real Robyn Davidson herself.

This is a much watch for all the solo women travellers around the world and gives them the best possible message: “Leave everything behind”.

4. Gorillas in the Mist

Gorillas in the Mist (Source)

Based on Dian Fossey’s autobiography, Gorillas in the Mist is about the story of a Kentucky woman who travels all the way to Africa, delving into the Rwandan jungles, to study the rare mountain gorillas in the latter half of the twentieth century. She eventually becomes attached to the gorillas, treats them like her own children and vehemently opposes Rwandan government’s exploitation of these creatures by partaking in anti-poaching patrols and burning down poachers’ villages.

The film showcases real gorillas in the jungles of Congo and Rwanda, and Sigourney Weaver does a brilliant job portraying Dian Fossey. A must watch for animal rights enthusiasts who love to travel. Warning: You might end up bawling from time to time.

5. 127 Hours

127 Hours (Source)

127 Hours is the real life, gruesome story of the engineer, climber and canyoneer Aron Ralston, who travelled to Blue John Canyon without telling anyone to spend the weekend doing what he likes to do: climb the isolated canyon. After spending fun moments with two other travel companions, he continued alone. But while descending a canyon crack, a chockstone came loose rolling onto his arm. Aron, realizing that he was stuck, tried finding a way to release the stone.

This movie won’t exactly ‘inspire’ you to travel solo but will make you realize that sheer will power and determination will get you out of the toughest spots in life, quite literally.

6. Motorcycle Diaries

The Motorcycle Diaries (Source)

The Motorcycle Diaries showcases a twenty-something Che Guevara stumbling across his life’s calling by way of an adventurous 8,000 km road trip along with his friend across South America’s vast expanse. Like typical college students, they seek fun and adventure and resolve to travel across Argentina, Chile, Peru, Colombia, and Venezuela.

Perpetually broke with a raging libido and just each other for company, the journey soon turns into a life lesson. Travel changes one in so many ways and Che Guevara’s story is one of the most brilliant examples of this fact.

7. Touching the Void

Touching the Void (Source)

Again, don’t be discouraged by watching this mountain climbing movie. Unlike 127 Hours, it has a slightly less gruesome ending. Touching the Void covers the true story of two climbers, Joe Simpson and Simon Yates, who set out to climb the west face of the 6,244-metre tall Siula Grande in the Peruvian Andes in the year 1985 – a feat which hadn’t be accomplished before. The duo manages to reach the peak but while descending, one of them breaks a leg (literally). And when you thought things can’t get any worse, Simpson (the one with the broken leg) falls into a crevasse. Simon continues the descent by himself, assuming Simpson to be dead.

How Simpson survived the fall and made it back to base camp is a story that will astound and inspire.

8. Seven Years in Tibet

Seven Years in Tibet (Source)

This movie starring Brad Pitt is based on the true story of Heinrich Harrer, an Austrian mountain climber who became friends with the Dalai Lama at the time of China’s takeover of Tibet. Heinirch decides to climb Nanga Parbat but fate has other plans for him and WWII breaks out in the midst of which he’s captured. He manages to escape from the PoW camp into the holy city of Lhasa where he befriends the Dalai Lama. At that time, Communist China attacks Tibet and Heinrich’s life changes forever.

Only Brad Pitt’s German accent is the disappointing thing about this movie and the film does deviate from time to time from the actual events that took place. But for the love of Hollywood and travel, watch this movie for the snowy Himalayas, the Tibetan villages, and the amazing costumes and religious ceremonies which have been portrayed in an aesthetically pleasing way.

9. North Face

North Face (Source)

Based in the year 1936, North Face retells the story of two German climbers who are driven by the Nazi propanaganda to compete by climbing the most dangerous rock face in the Alps. At that time, the German government publicity had actually drawn attention to German and Austrian mountaineering, and to climbing the North Face in particular, as matters of German national and ethnic pride.

This film is a travelogue back in time, from Berlin to Bavaria to the Swiss Alps by bicycle and train. North Face is by far my favorite mountain climbing movie.

10. Wild

Wild (Source)

Starring Reese Witherspoon, Wild is based on the true-life chronicle of Cheryl Strayed’s 1,100-mile trek across the Pacific Crest Trail. Struggling with personal tragedies, a heroin addiction and driven by sheer determination, she embarks on the hike having absolutely no experience.

This movie is an inspiring tale for all solo women travellers, and it is bound to trigger the traveller inside of you, especially when Cheryl reaches the Bridge of the Gods.

Movies and Travel:

Movies tend to inspire us and good movies even more so; add travel to that and what do you get? A mind-blowing, beautiful concoction that calls out to the traveller inside of you.

From tales of mountain climbers to those of solo women travellers, each movie has a story to tell. Some of the real-life protagonists survived to tell the tale and while others penned their narratives down before they died doing what they loved – travelling. Their stories are legendaryand each one is bound to inspire you to pack up your bags and have a real life adventure of your own.

If you don’t have any plans for the weekend, we suggest you pop that corn, dim the lights and have a travel movie marathon. Don’t forget to buy Coke. Popcorn’s no fun without Coke.

Did we miss out on your favourite travel movie? Do leave a comment below and tell us about it.  

Exploring the Endless Possibilites of “Andhadhun (2018)

This is just my observation from the movie and exploring all the possibilities of the endings and twist considering the point that each frame in the film has some importance. This is “Andhadhun (2018): Movie Explained!” and you can share your thoughts in the comments below after reading.

What is Life? It all depends on the Liver.

Let’s start with the first frame “What is Life? It all depends on the Liver.” This is the central point of the story, the doctor’s idea of selling the liver of Simi (Tabu) for 6 Crores to a Sheik in Dubai.

Simi’s Cornea and Liver Transplant

When Akash (Ayushmann Khurrana) narrates the story to Sophie (Radhika Apte), you can see the car crossing a tree.

So this marks the end of the story and the doctor donates Simi’s liver to The Sheik and gets 6 Crores. Akash gets 1 Crore. Simi undergoes a test for Cornea and if it matches with Akash they complete the eye transplant surgery. He then moves to London and continues to play blind so that he can concentrate and focus on his art.

Murali’s Death and Organ Donation

Well, here there is another case what if Simi’s cornea doesn’t match with Akash. In this case, he might get the cornea from Murali. There is a frame where nurse declares Murali is dead and Sukku can choose to donate his organ. So here doctor communicates with Sukku and tests for Cornea. Akash gets it done and then he moves to London.

The rabbit in the beginning scene and hunter might be a different one and doesn’t have anything to do with the story. Akash selecting rabbit stick might be just a coincidence. You need to assume it as per this narration. 

Everything is clear at this point, Akash completes his narration but Sophie asks “And then?” Here is the point where things turn, Akash explains a continued story (Probably a different one.)

Akash – The Good Guy

Now Akash continues the narration, in this frame, the car stops right to that tree. Simi kills the doctor and then tries to kill Akash but he got saved by the Rabbit. Simi dies and Akash then takes a bus to Mumbai. A friend helps him to get to London.

Simi’s Daughter (Daani) Frame 

This is one of the interesting frames, where the camera zooms into Pramod’s wall painting and then emotional Daani enters the frame talking to someone in mobile. Here she might be talking to Akash, where he reveals everything to Daani. From the beginning of the film, there are no friends for him, so the only friend now Akash have is Daani. So, Daani might have helped Akash to London and also get his cornea transplantation done.

Someone at the scene (maybe the hunter) might have told Akash that he got saved by the Rabbit. So as a tribute he’s using a Rabbit stick.

Akash Never Lost His Eyesight Completely

This is one of the interesting theories which I and my friend discussed at end of the movie. There was a shot where Akash dips his face in the bucket, you can the see damage was with one eye and the other eye relatively looked better. At first instance it looked like, the other eye was completely alright.

So going by this theory, he was never completely blind and can partially see. After Simi kills the doctor and the Rabbit saves Akash. He spotted the Rabbit and so as a tribute he carried the Rabbit stick. In this case, the cornea transplantation may or may not happen, in either of the case Akash kicking the can at the end is justified.

They might be several questions in this case, why Akash didn’t escape from Murali and Sukku or why he let Simi go free from the chair, etc. The possible answer to all these questions is that after Sophie leaves Akash, she never knows what happened, so the story Akash narrated to Sophie may or may not happened exactly.

Though this ending might sound ridiculous but there is a possibility for that.

Accidental Trash Can

All these theories started because Akash kicked the trash can, which opened the doors of the possibility of getting his eyesight back. What if he just did it by accident, not by intention. 

5 Best Hacking Movies Based On True Stories & Events

Earlier we compiled two posts – Movies Based On Hacking & TV Series Based On Hacking and now we decided to mention the interesting hacking movies based on true stories or events. It’s a different experience to watch these films and realize the movie scenes are incidents which happened before.

Hacking Movies Based On True Stories/Events

1. 23 (1998)

Storyline: The movie’s plot is based on the true story of a group of young computer hackers from Hannover, Germany. In the late 1980s, the orphaned Karl Koch invests his heritage in a flat and a home.


2. Takedown (2000)

Storyline: This film is based on the story of the capture of computer hacker “Kevin Mitnick.”


3. Underground: The Julian Assange Story (2012)

Storyline: A look at the early career of Wikileaks founder, Julian Assange.


4. The Fifth Estate (2013)

Storyline: A dramatic thriller based on real events that reveal the quest to expose the deceptions and corruptions of power that turned an Internet upstart into the 21st century’s most fiercely debated organization.


5. Who Am I – Kein System ist sicher (2014)

Storyline: Benjamin, a young German computer whiz, is invited to join a subversive hacker group that wants to be noticed on the world’s stage.

The 50 best World War II movies

The cinema of World War II is gritty, glorious and seriously extensive. There were so many great war movies made during the war itself, it’s a wonder anyone was available to do any actual fighting. Since then, each decade has spun its own take on this epic conflict, mining nuance from what’s often depicted as a black-and-white struggle between good and evil. And from Clint Eastwood’s ‘Letters From Iwo Jima’ to Sam Peckinpah’s ‘Cross of Iron’, filmmakers have even crossed the divide to tell stories from the enemy’s perspective.

But with so many WWII films out there, which ones are the greatest? From big-budget action epics, subtle romances, tragic dramas and starkly realistic depictions of the conflict, here are 50 of the best World War II films, as chosen by our Time Out writers and the venerable director, Quentin Tarantino.

Recommended: London and UK cinema listings, film reviews and exclusive interviews. ShareTweet  

The best World War II movies: 50-41

50  

Paratroop Command (1959)

Quentin Tarantino kicks things off with a riveting obscurity

Quentin Tarantino says… ‘This is by one of my favourite directors, William Witney, an American who quit the movie business to go into the army. You can tell it was made by someone who’d been there. It follows a group of paratroopers in Italy, but one of them’s a fuck-up who accidentally kills one of his team. So he has people in the platoon who want to kill him, just waiting for the right gunfight. And the end of the movie is so exciting. They have to cross a field of landmines, sending one guy in after another until he gets blown up. Eventually, somebody will get to the other side. All these characters just start getting wiped out.’   49   Film

Escape to Victory (1981)

Football, football über alles

Footie and war! Like those birthday cards in the ‘For Boys’ section of card shops with a picture of a racing car jumping over a steam train full of cowboys, ‘Escape to Victory’ has everything for the sexually immature adolescent male. But this comic-book fantasy, in which Allied POWs are forced to play a lose-lose football match against their Nazi captors, turns out to be a whole big barrel of fun. Sure, it’s hardly a masterpiece, but any film starring Sly Stallone, Pelé, Max Von Sydow and Bobby Moore has to be worth 117 minutes of anyone’s time. PF

Buy, rent or watch ‘Escape to Victory’ Read more ADVERTISING

48   Film, Drama

Stalingrad (1993)

Winter is coming

Forget ‘Enemy at the Gates’ and the 2015 Fyodor Bondarchuk CG-fest, this rare Germans’ eye view of the conflict is a much more authentic glimpse of the hell that was Stalingrad – the turning point in World War II and one of the most brutal battles in human history. Thomas Kretschmann plays a Nazi office leading a platoon into the crucible and, in the spirit of ‘Das Boot’ (with which this film shares producers), struggling to lead them out again. It’s harrowing, bleak viewing. It’s also an incredibly honest example of a film addressing a country’s horror-filled past: honest and uncomfortable to the last. This story had no happy ending. PDS

Buy, rent or watch ‘Stalingrad’ Read more 47   Film, Horror

The Keep (1983)

Totally schlossed

This is a gloriously bizarre cod-spiritualist dark castle chiller from a pre ‘Miami Vice’ Michael Mann. The mist-shrouded opening sequences, as Jürgen Prochnow’s dead-meat Nazi platoon occupy the titular demon-occupied fortress, are breathtaking, Mann’s superb eye for visual detail fusing with some spectacular design work to create a real atmosphere of impending dread. It begins to fall apart with the introduction of Scott Glenn’s mystical Jewish translator (yes, his name really is Glaeken Trismegestus), but the film’s unashamed weirdness and wondrous sets have helped to build a pretty solid fanbase. TH

Buy, rent or watch ‘The Keep’ Read more ADVERTISING

46   Film

Days of Glory (2006)

Out of Africa

There are hundreds of untold WWII stories still to be filmed. Rachid Bouchareb’s drama shines a light on those North African soldiers drafted in to fight for the Free French after D-Day. The film itself is a mite predictable, but what’s impressive are the ripples it created: after release, the French government agreed, for the first time, to begin paying compensation to the remaining widows of North African fighters. Proof that a work of art can still have direct political impact. TH

Buy, rent or watch ‘Days of Glory’ Read more 45   Film, Drama

The Pianist (2002)

Tinkling the ivories

Roman Polanski kicked off the twenty-first century with a sophisticated, Oscar-winning WWII survival drama which not only offered an authentic depiction of the Warsaw ghetto, but proved that – controversy aside – the director could still deliver when it mattered. Adrien Brody deservedly picked up Best Actor for his muted portrayal of Jewish concert pianist Władysław Szpilman, whose mission to stay alive against titanic odds is an inspiring testament to the human instinct for self-preservation. DJ

Buy, rent or watch ‘The Pianist’  Read more ADVERTISING

44   Film, Drama

The Dam Busters (1954)

Buuuh buh buh buh buh-buh buuuh buh…

‘The Dam Busters’ represents a particularly British type of cinematic military endeavour, shuffling us in and out of an endless series of stuffy boardrooms, past a chain-smoking array of lab-coated eggheads and through a rigorous testing process before allowing its audience to experience anything approaching excitement. Happily, said development is lent charm and eloquence by the ever-impeccable Michael Redgrave as ‘bouncing bomb’ boffin Barnes Wallis. And the actual busting of the dams of the Ruhr Valley is an edge-of-the-seat, seat-of-the-pants ride. ALD

Buy, rent or watch ‘The Dam Busters’ Read more 43   Film, Comedy

I Was a Male War Bride (1949)

Cary on cross-dressing

Hollywood has a bad reputation for fixing tricky book titles, like going from ‘Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep?’ to ‘Blade Runner’. In the case of French Army Officer Henri Rochard’s autobiography ‘I Was an Alien Spouse of Female Military Personnel Enroute to the United States Under Public Law 271 of the Congress’, we reckon they had a point. In this jolly gender-swap comedy from screwball master Howard Hawks, Cary Grant plays Rochard (mercifully eschewing a French accent), whose romance with chauffeur Ann Sheridan somehow leads to him dressing as a woman and smuggling himself into the US. TH

Buy, rent or watch ‘I Was a Male War Bride’ Read more ADVERTISING

42

The cinema of World War II is gritty, glorious and seriously extensive. There were so many great war movies made during the war itself, it’s a wonder anyone was available to do any actual fighting. Since then, each decade has spun its own take on this epic conflict, mining nuance from what’s often depicted as a black-and-white struggle between good and evil. And from Clint Eastwood’s ‘Letters From Iwo Jima’ to Sam Peckinpah’s ‘Cross of Iron’, filmmakers have even crossed the divide to tell stories from the enemy’s perspective.

But with so many WWII films out there, which ones are the greatest? From big-budget action epics, subtle romances, tragic dramas and starkly realistic depictions of the conflict, here are 50 of the best World War II films, as chosen by our Time Out writers and the venerable director, Quentin Tarantino.

Recommended: London and UK cinema listings, film reviews and exclusive interviews. ShareTweet  

The best World War II movies: 50-41

50  

Paratroop Command (1959)

Quentin Tarantino kicks things off with a riveting obscurity

Quentin Tarantino says… ‘This is by one of my favourite directors, William Witney, an American who quit the movie business to go into the army. You can tell it was made by someone who’d been there. It follows a group of paratroopers in Italy, but one of them’s a fuck-up who accidentally kills one of his team. So he has people in the platoon who want to kill him, just waiting for the right gunfight. And the end of the movie is so exciting. They have to cross a field of landmines, sending one guy in after another until he gets blown up. Eventually, somebody will get to the other side. All these characters just start getting wiped out.’   49   Film

Escape to Victory (1981)

Football, football über alles

Footie and war! Like those birthday cards in the ‘For Boys’ section of card shops with a picture of a racing car jumping over a steam train full of cowboys, ‘Escape to Victory’ has everything for the sexually immature adolescent male. But this comic-book fantasy, in which Allied POWs are forced to play a lose-lose football match against their Nazi captors, turns out to be a whole big barrel of fun. Sure, it’s hardly a masterpiece, but any film starring Sly Stallone, Pelé, Max Von Sydow and Bobby Moore has to be worth 117 minutes of anyone’s time. PF

Buy, rent or watch ‘Escape to Victory’ Read more ADVERTISING

48   Film, Drama

Stalingrad (1993)

Winter is coming

Forget ‘Enemy at the Gates’ and the 2015 Fyodor Bondarchuk CG-fest, this rare Germans’ eye view of the conflict is a much more authentic glimpse of the hell that was Stalingrad – the turning point in World War II and one of the most brutal battles in human history. Thomas Kretschmann plays a Nazi office leading a platoon into the crucible and, in the spirit of ‘Das Boot’ (with which this film shares producers), struggling to lead them out again. It’s harrowing, bleak viewing. It’s also an incredibly honest example of a film addressing a country’s horror-filled past: honest and uncomfortable to the last. This story had no happy ending. PDS

Buy, rent or watch ‘Stalingrad’ Read more 47   Film, Horror

The Keep (1983)

Totally schlossed

This is a gloriously bizarre cod-spiritualist dark castle chiller from a pre ‘Miami Vice’ Michael Mann. The mist-shrouded opening sequences, as Jürgen Prochnow’s dead-meat Nazi platoon occupy the titular demon-occupied fortress, are breathtaking, Mann’s superb eye for visual detail fusing with some spectacular design work to create a real atmosphere of impending dread. It begins to fall apart with the introduction of Scott Glenn’s mystical Jewish translator (yes, his name really is Glaeken Trismegestus), but the film’s unashamed weirdness and wondrous sets have helped to build a pretty solid fanbase. TH

Buy, rent or watch ‘The Keep’ Read more ADVERTISING

46   Film

Days of Glory (2006)

Out of Africa

There are hundreds of untold WWII stories still to be filmed. Rachid Bouchareb’s drama shines a light on those North African soldiers drafted in to fight for the Free French after D-Day. The film itself is a mite predictable, but what’s impressive are the ripples it created: after release, the French government agreed, for the first time, to begin paying compensation to the remaining widows of North African fighters. Proof that a work of art can still have direct political impact. TH

Buy, rent or watch ‘Days of Glory’ Read more 45   Film, Drama

The Pianist (2002)

Tinkling the ivories

Roman Polanski kicked off the twenty-first century with a sophisticated, Oscar-winning WWII survival drama which not only offered an authentic depiction of the Warsaw ghetto, but proved that – controversy aside – the director could still deliver when it mattered. Adrien Brody deservedly picked up Best Actor for his muted portrayal of Jewish concert pianist Władysław Szpilman, whose mission to stay alive against titanic odds is an inspiring testament to the human instinct for self-preservation. DJ

Buy, rent or watch ‘The Pianist’  Read more ADVERTISING

44   Film, Drama

The Dam Busters (1954)

Buuuh buh buh buh buh-buh buuuh buh…

‘The Dam Busters’ represents a particularly British type of cinematic military endeavour, shuffling us in and out of an endless series of stuffy boardrooms, past a chain-smoking array of lab-coated eggheads and through a rigorous testing process before allowing its audience to experience anything approaching excitement. Happily, said development is lent charm and eloquence by the ever-impeccable Michael Redgrave as ‘bouncing bomb’ boffin Barnes Wallis. And the actual busting of the dams of the Ruhr Valley is an edge-of-the-seat, seat-of-the-pants ride. ALD

Buy, rent or watch ‘The Dam Busters’ Read more 43   Film, Comedy

I Was a Male War Bride (1949)

Cary on cross-dressing

Hollywood has a bad reputation for fixing tricky book titles, like going from ‘Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep?’ to ‘Blade Runner’. In the case of French Army Officer Henri Rochard’s autobiography ‘I Was an Alien Spouse of Female Military Personnel Enroute to the United States Under Public Law 271 of the Congress’, we reckon they had a point. In this jolly gender-swap comedy from screwball master Howard Hawks, Cary Grant plays Rochard (mercifully eschewing a French accent), whose romance with chauffeur Ann Sheridan somehow leads to him dressing as a woman and smuggling himself into the US. TH

Buy, rent or watch ‘I Was a Male War Bride’ Read more ADVERTISING

42   Film, Thrillers

Black Book (2006)

Dutch courage

Almost three decades after his handsome but rather sedate resistance story ‘Soldier of Orange’, shockmeister Paul Verhoeven revisited WWII for a tale of Jewish subterfuge and erotic espionage, filling the screen with all the sex, death and pube-dyeing the earlier film sadly lacked. But beneath all the nudity and bloodshed is an intelligent, original study of occupation and revenge: the final shot, subtly drawing parallels between the occupation of Holland and the birth of Israel, is courageous and brilliant. TH

Buy, rent or  Film, Thrillers

Black Book (2006)

Dutch courage

Almost three decades after his handsome but rather sedate resistance story ‘Soldier of Orange’, shockmeister Paul Verhoeven revisited WWII for a tale of Jewish subterfuge and erotic espionage, filling the screen with all the sex, death and pube-dyeing the earlier film sadly lacked. But beneath all the nudity and bloodshed is an intelligent, original study of occupation and revenge: the final shot, subtly drawing parallels between the occupation of Holland and the birth of Israel, is courageous and brilliant. TH

Buy, rent or 

10+ Best Disaster Movies Inspired By True Events & Stories

Remember 2012, the disaster movie which was supposed to deeply impress us by using the Mayan theory, amazing effects but failed to do so?? And some others which made no sense. Not to worry. Hollywood is full of disaster movies, and some of them are based on true events. Events which we might not have paid heed to or never even heard about them. But we have curated a list for you which might help you explore an amazing genre of movies. So grab a bucket of popcorn and start a movie marathon.

Here’s a list of best disaster movies that we have curated for you:

Best Disaster Movies Inspired By True Events & Stories

1. Tora! Tora! Tora! (1970)

A story based on the background which led to disaster at Pearl Harbor, Tora! Tora! Tora intercepts how America’s negligence and one Imperial Japanese Navy Staff Officer’s plotting, resulted in the event which changed the history of United States of America. The film targets on the negligence of American Naval Forces, who had intercepted the attack well before, but never, believed that Japanese could ever attempt to do such a thing.


2. Dead Ahead: The Exxon Valdez Disaster (1992)

A fact based movie based on Corporations killing mother nature, Exxon top management employee Frank Larossi gets into a public scandal in which, one of his company’s truck spills oil in Alaska creating and ecological situation. A conservation officer Dan Lawn wants the corporation and public to start the cleanup and make an example of ignorance out of the incident. The only problem is that Larossi only cares about his company’s image, and not the damage caused by nature, leading to a clash of ideologies.


3. Alive (1993)

What will you do if you don’t want to die? Alive is a story about Uruguay Rugby Team, which became a victim of a plane crash in Andes Mountains. The group leader, Nando makes sure that everyone’s spirit is up and running and nobody gives up on hope, a medical student Roberto attends to team injuries and a team member Antonio is on the verge of breaking down. As the utilities run out, the victims face a terrible dilemma; start eating their deceased team mates or succumb to death due to hunger.


4. Apollo 13 (1995)

Based on the actual events of Apollo 13 mission to the moon by NASA, astronauts Jim, Fred and Jack have the mission imprinted on their head. Everything goes well, even the launch. But as soon as they enter the space, one of the oxygen tanks explodes due to which scheduled landing on Moon is called off. This creates havoc amongst the team members, and they start working on their survival plan and how to return safely to earth.


5. Titanic (1997)

A Princess and a Pauper who fell in love on an ill-fated ship. Titanic is based on the true disaster event when R.M.S Titanic, one of the largest ship afloat, sank due to collision with an iceberg during its maiden voyage from Southampton UK to New York, US. The disaster resulted in the death of more than 1500 passengers onboard. The movie was made in 1997 and turned out to be a huge success! Four golden globe awards and eleven Academy Awards, it is one of the best creations of James Cameron. READ 5+ Best Bank Robbery Movies Based On True Events & Stories  


6. The Perfect Storm (2000)

Based on the true story of a fishing vessel, Andrea Gail, The Perfect Storm is the story of survival in extreme condition. A film that portrays how fishers and rescue vessels risk their lives against the deadly forces of the sea. When Andrea Gail sets on a fishing journey on the day of Halloween of 1991, they are confronted with three waterfronts divulging into one massive force which is meant to kill them. All three waterfronts create The Perfect Storm, which is the most famous storm in our world.


7. Pearl Harbor (2001)

The attack on Pearl Harbor was a surprise military strike by Imperial Japanese Navy in the wee hours of December 7, 1941. The movie, Pearl Harbor is based on the same event with a twist of romance and betrayal in it. Boyhood friends Rafe and Danny are both fighter pilots in the US army stationed at Pearl Harbor. Rafe is so interested in fighting the war that he takes off to Europe to fight alongside English Army, leaving Danny and Rachel, the love of his life. Both Danny and Rachel then receive news that Rafe has died in action which devastates both their worlds. Finding solace in each other, they try and get back to their normal life, until one day, Rafe comes back from the dead. The day when Pearl Harbor was destroyed!


8. K-19 The Widowmaker (2002)

K-19 is the story about a nuclear submarine by the same name, which encountered some defects and turned into a human-made disaster. Captain Alexi Vostrikov is ordered to take over command of K-19, “The Widow Maker,” which is Soviet’s pride. His assignment includes the task of repairing the submarine and take it on a voyage so that pride of Soviet can be re-instated during the height of Cold War. But only Alexi knows how risky it can be for his men and how the faulty submarine can trigger a nuclear war. Harrison Ford’s acting is something which will leave you mesmerized.


9. World Trade Center (2006)

A stunning tribute to people who lost their lives in a tragedy, World Trade Center is a story about two port authority officers, John and Will, who got trapped in the rubble when both North and South towers came down crashing during the September 11, 2001, terrorist attack on the World Trade Center.


10. Unstoppable (2010)

Based on a true incident of CSX-8888, Unstoppable is a story about an unmanned train that goes out of control. The problem is not just derailment; it’s the toxic materials that the train is carrying. Materials that are capable of taking human lives and create a massive ecological disaster. The task of stopping the train comes on the shoulders of a veteran locomotive engineer and a young train conductor.


11. The Impossible (2012)

A real life story of Indian Ocean Tsunami survivors, Maria and Henry along with their three kids start their winter vacation in Thailand. But on the day after Christmas, sea plans to engulf them all. The Indian Ocean Tsunami strikes Thailand shores. During such terrible times, how the family manages to survive has turned out to be a great movie! READ 15+ Best Bollywood Crime Movies Based On True Stories & Events  


12. Chernobyl Diaries (2012)

Chernobyl disaster is a nuclear event which took place on 26 April 1986, at the Chernobyl Nuclear Plant, Ukraine. An explosion and after fire released radioactive substances in the area, killing many and seeping into the genetics of the coming generations. Chernobyl Diaries is a thriller which covers the incident, where six tourists with a tourist guide go to Pripyat city, to look for workers of the Chernobyl Incident. Afterward, they realize, they are not alone in this journey.


13. Everest (2015)

Morning of May 10, 1996. Climbers from two ascents start their journey to summit the Mt Everest. But death awaits just a few steps away from their goal. With little warning, a violent storm is determined to take their lives. The team is stuck between blizzards and harsh conditions and get into an epic battle for survival.


14. The Finest Hours (2016)

Coastal Guards, exciting job profile but very dangerous. Why would anyone risk their life to rescue people from dangers of waters? A blizzard in 1952 destroys two oil tankers near the coast of Cape Cod. The Finest Hours is the story based on same incident, where Coastal Guards make a daring rescue of people stuck near the oil tankers.


15. USS Indianapolis: Men of Courage (2016)

Based on real story, the night of July 30, 1945, USS Indianapolis was returning from U.S. base on Tinian Island in the Philippines Sea, where it had delivered Uranium to make bombs which were to be dropped on Nagasaki and Hiroshima. A Japanese submarine slammed two torpedoes into the ship. And then, a disaster happened which is still gives a chill to its survivors. 900 crew men died, succumbing to hunger dehydration, drowning, and sharks. And rescue came after five days!


These are some of the best Disaster movies based on true stories and events, we’ll be updating this list frequently, feel free to let us know your favorite movies in the comments below, or if we missed any videos, kindly let us know that as well.

Celebrating the Most Frightening Entries in ‘Godzilla’ Canon!

In 1954 Ishirō Honda unleashed a starkly realized vision of destruction with the release of Gojira. “Godzilla”, as the monster became known here in the states, was a fire breathing behemoth, evil incarnate, and a stand in for the ever-present fear of the atomic bomb. Countless sequels throughout the Showa Period (1954 – 1975) would steer Godzilla away from atomic breathing embodiment of an entire nation’s nightmare and reframe him as the cartoonish good guy all the kiddos could root for.

Don’t take this as me hating on the more lighthearted entries in the series; I absolutely adore them.


Bloodshed in the Show Era

When I was younger, TCM would run all day marathons of classic Godzilla films, and I would sit glued to my TV for every poorly dubbed, cheeseball moment. That said, even I couldn’t withstand the saccharine cuteness of Son of GodzillaMinilla is where I draw the line, folks. Even during the later Showa era with it’s Saturday morning cartoon aesthetic (the hilarious teamup of Godzilla and “Jet Jaguar” complete with flying kicks in Godzilla vs Megalon will never be forgotten), there remained images of brutality that would stick with me as an impressionable youth.

The original Godzilla vs Mechagodzilla features some awfully bloody beatdowns. Mechagodzilla flies towards a weakened Big G, blasting eye lasers directly at the roaring beast’s jugular. A literal geyser of blood springs from the wound. This happens much later in the same film where a decoy ‘Zilla rips the jaws of C-level baddie Anguirus apart before yanking the monster’s tongue right out of his mouth in exceptionally bloody detail. Yay! Family fun!

Despite occasional displays of grand guignol dismemberment, most of the Showa era films hew pretty close to the family-friendly matinee playbook. While some might callout Godzilla vs Hedorah (AKA Godzilla vs The Smog Monster) as being nightmare-inducing due to its truly out there psychedelic imagery and stomach-churning depictions of sludge, it wasn’t until the Heisei era (1984 – 1995) that filmmakers started exploring Godzilla’s darker side once again.


Godzilla vs Biollante (1989)

After a five year hiatus from cinemas, Toho was eager to continue the Heisei era that had begun with The Return of Godzilla (AKA Godzilla 1985).  Return’s aim was to bring some of the gravitas back to the character. Godzilla was no longer a hero of the people. This time around the big green machine was once again a one-track minded mechanism of destruction. Godzilla vs Biollante picks up right where Return left off before jumping forward five years. Amongst the ruins of Tokyo, a team of scientists are tasked with collecting biological samples of the main man himself. Unfortunately, there are some not so friendly folks who want to get their mitts on the genetic material as well.

These opening moments cement the more adult tone with dark cinematography, shadowy gun battles, and some surprising bloodshed. Rumor has it director Kazuki Omori wasn’t terribly interested in helming a man-in-suit production and was keen to get behind the camera of a James Bond picture. This explains Biollante’s subplot featuring espionage, spy vs spy, and shadowy assassins. Despite a lot of narrative real estate being taken over by these warring factions clamoring for “Godzilla cells,” the Bond-esque plot never really pays off. Thankfully, it’s of little consequence as Godzilla vs Biollante excels when the focus is on good ol’ fashioned mad science/creature feature mayhem.

The convoluted plot involves Dr. Shiragami, a geneticist whose daughter is killed during an attack on his lab in attempt to steal the valuable Godzilla cells. Being a geneticist and whatnot, he obvi decides it would be a great idea to splice his daughter’s DNA with that of her prized rose garden. When Miki, a telepath from the Japanese Psyonics Research Center (and a recurring character through most of the Heisei era), confirms the genetically altered roses exhibit some psychic energy, Shiragami takes things up a notch by adding some Godzilla ju-ju into the mix. Wouldn’t you know, half-plant/half-‘Zillas containing the soul of a human are ultimately a really bad idea?

Yes, the plot here is pretty wild, but for the first time since Gojira, it feels like Omori is trying to tap into national fears and exploit a genuine sense of horror. Omori banks on burgeoning fears of biochemical warfare to elevate this entry. In an equally smart bit of social commentary, the use of Godzilla cells are considered controversial and locked away tight by the government, only allowing them to be used when they see fit. The argument is made these cells could lead to huge scientific breakthroughs if access were made available…but at what cost? While the use of stem-cells were still fairly new at the time of this film’s release, it’s a curious inclusion that surely meant something to the director.

What about the horror, though? That’s what you came for, right? Biollante is one nasty piece of work. Beginning a theme that would carry over into many of the Heisei films, the monster mutates through numerous forms throughout the picture. In one of the most straight-forward horror leaning sequences, a bit of double espionage is spoiled by an all-out monster attack. As two different sets of spies infiltrate Shiragami’s lab in an attempt to steal those darn cells again, baby Biollante breaks free from her greenhouse and wreaks some true monster movie havoc. Flying tentacles erupt from wooden floorboards, wrap around their victims, and fling them around the room. Bloodied corpses and green slime ensue.

From here, Biollante grows to “legitimate threat to Godzilla” size, and the real Kaiju action begins. The creature’s second form is quite a marvel: huge vines weave together a body that is capped off with a mutated rosebud for a head. The original design was actually meant to feature the face of a human girl at its center. Now that would have been horrifying.

Biollante’s final form is nothing if not terrifying, however. The climactic battle is one of the greatest in Godzilla canon. Biollante erupts from the ground with an elongated jaw filled with rows of gnashing teeth, a giant belly of glowing embers, and an entire army of Little Shop flytrap tentacles snapping and impaling their prey. It’s one of the gooiest battle scenes in the entire franchise. The flytrap-tentacles literally burrow straight through the palms of G’s hand unleashing buckets of green slime. We even get a nice Regan pea-soup moment as Biollante literally vomits a truckload of glittering bile all over her opponent. It’s wicked stuff and is sure to tickle the fancy of any creature-feature aficionado.


Godzilla vs Destroyah (1995)

Godzilla vs Destroyah has always been one of my favorite flicks in the series. If you couldn’t tell, I’m extremely partial to the Heisei era. While Biollante set a more serious tone for the further adventures of Big G, the succeeding entries returned Godzilla to more of an anti-hero role while still having some fun with the human narratives surrounding him. We had takes on Indiana Jones-style action with Godzilla vs Mothra and a twisty sci-fi riff on Terminator with the gonzo time travel shenanigans of Godzilla vs King Ghidorah (for reals, that’s a fun one). They even brought back “Godzilla Jr,” though the little tyke is massively less annoying than Minila and proves to be fairly endearing, especially in this, the final film of the timeline.

Destroyah is quite possibly the darkest film in the franchise outside of the original. The intent with the release was to officially kill off Godzilla for at least ten years in order to make room for the planned American trilogy that launched in 1996. Well, we all know how that went down, and Toho was back at it only four years later with Godzilla 2000 in 1999. Nonetheless, there’s a finality to this entry. The opening moments reveal a glowing Godzilla rampaging like he does best. His chest pulses bright red as if something is burning inside of him. Well, that’s exactly what is happening.

Kenichi Yamane, a college student with a fascination for Godzilla, believes the giant monster carries with it an atomic core deep inside, an atomic core that is slowly failing – turning Godzilla himself into a literal walking atomic bomb that could turn all of Japan “into a cemetery.” In many callbacks to the original film, Kenichi is the grandson of Gojira’s Dr. Yamane, the man behind the oxygen destroyer that initially brought down the monster.

Destroyah exists firmly within the Heisei continuity with a subplot featuring psychic Miki trying to locate Junior and the return of hotshot Sho Kuroki from Biollante. Despite this, in many ways, it feels like the Halloween ’18 of Godzilla flicks as a multitude of parallels are drawn between the original film from 30 years prior. As this was intended to be the last Godzilla film for some time, Toho very much wanted this to be of a piece with Gojira.

In terms of frights, Destroyah feels like a mid-90’s horror film from it’s slick cinematography and ominous score to its suspenseful setpieces. The actual Destroyah in question is first established as a microscopic organism found in soil samples taken from the now-defunct “Monster Island.” It’s slowly growing, taking on similar characteristics of the oxygen destroyer of yore. A lone security guard at an aquarium is horrified to find all the fish in the tank decaying before his eyes, leaving nothing but bones. A swat team is sent in to put down the creature before it can grow any larger. This leads us to one helluva sequence that features armed men battling a horde of human-sized crab-like creatures with glowing eyes, atomic breath, and sharp claws. In a scene that feels like it was ripped from countless other Aliens rip-offs, it’s easy to forget you’re watching a Godzilla pic.

After the complete massacre of an entire swat team, it’s time for all the mini-Destroyahs to join forces as they mutate in one giant mutha’ that resembles a horned demon straight from the depths of hell. The final battle here is another for the Kaiju record books, as Big G on the verge of a literal meltdown takes on his most vicious foe yet…while sweet Godzilla Junior watches it all go down. Surprisingly, Godzilla vs Destroyah manages to muster up a bit of pathos in its final moments. The film balances reverence for the film that started it all, wild special effects monster mayhem, an emotional arch for the Big Guy, and one of the meanest villains in all of Godzilla canon. It’s the perfect bookend to one of my favorite slices of Godzilla continuity.


King of the Monsters

While, I don’t anticipate Michael Dougherty’s Godzilla: King of the Monsterswill be a full-blown horror film, I do know the director promised some of his love for the genre would seep through. At the end of the day, we should all be celebrating the ongoing legacy of ‘Zilla. This is the type of franchise that lulls kiddos into the horror genre. Godzilla is simply the gateway drug to something like Tremors. From there…it’s nothing but George Romero zombies and Fulci gut-munchers. Okay, maybe that was only my personal trajectory, but still – Godzilla might not be all blood and guts or terribly frightening. It is nonetheless the longest running franchise in history, and it revolves around giant mo

The Between Two Ferns Movie Is Coming to Netflix in September

The Netflix film adaptation of Zach Galifianakis’s Emmy-winning mock-interview series Between Two Ferns has finally received a release date and synopsis.

Set to debut on the streaming platform on Sept. 20, the Scott Aukerman-directed film follows Galifianakis as he becomes a viral laughingstock after Will Ferrell discovers his public access TV show Between Two Ferns and uploads it to Funny Or Die. To restore his reputation, Galifianakis and “his crew” will embark on a road trip to complete a series of high-profile celebrity interviews.

Guest stars appearing in Between Two Ferns: The Movie have yet to be revealed, but the casting is billed as “featuring celebrities you’ve heard of.” That’s better than nothing.

Initial news of the web series’ adaptation broke in December, when it was reported that Peter Dinklage, The Hangoverduo Ed Helms and Bradley Cooper, Keanu Reeves and David Letterman would be making guest appearances. Seeing that Galifianakis announced the film’s release date at Thursday’s FYSEE event for My Next Guest Needs No Introduction With David Letterman, the latter seems likely.

Created by Aukerman and Galifianakis in 2008, Between Two Ferns features Galifianakis interviewing celebrities in a bizarre, antagonistic manner in the vein of low-budget, public-access television shows. Now airing sporadically on Funny Or Die, the show has featured a strange roster of guests, including Michael Cera, Sean Penn, Tila Tequila and then-President Barack Obama. The most recent episode, featuring Jerry Seinfeld and Cardi B, debuted last June.

The film was scripted by both Aukerman and Galifianakis, who serve as producers alongside Funny Or Die’s Caitlin Daley and Mike Farah.

Best Korean Horror Movies You Should Definitely Watch!

Asian horror films have a reputation for being truly unconventional with disturbing story lines, and Korea has a fair share of it. Here’s a list of best Korean Horror movies curated for you which can guarantee you goose bumps and some sleepless nights!

Best Korean Horror Movies Of All Time (List)

1. 301/302 (1995) | “301, 302”

Two neighbors, Song-Hee, and Yun-hee, both with a troubled past. Song-hee is a chef and Yun-hee is an anorexic writer. Looking at her condition, Song-hee starts making food for her. An initial helping gesture turns out to be tormenting for Yun-hee, and it takes a weird turn when Song-hee starts forcing the food into her mouth. Two lives, showing how a person can change by living in isolation. And a worthy watch too, thanks to its submission for Academy awards.


2. Whispering Corridors (1998) | Yeogo goedam

Whispering Corridors is series of movies depicting the existence of Ghosts in our lives. The first movie is about a teenager who dies in her school. She comes backs as a ghost and asks her friend to help her find who killed her. Both the friends then start their investigation, and what they come across leaves them to spell bounded.


3. Ring (1999)

When her niece is found dead along with her three friends after watching a cursed videotape, Reporter Reiko sets on to investigate the secret behind their murder. She takes the tape and watches it and gets a call after half an hour. Someone says that she will die in one week. Determined to solve the mystery behind the case, she gets on to get to the bottom and history of the tape and go back to a murder which could have avoided all other future ones.


4. Memento Mori (1999) | Yeogo goedam II

One of the first Korean movies depicting lesbian relationship, Memento Mori is a story about two high school girls romantically involved. Yoo Shi-eun and Min Hyo-shin’s relationship is the talk of their school. But their relationship succumbs to social pressure which makes Shi-Eun distance herself from the clingy Hyo-Shin. Hyo-shin reacts poorly to the incident and commits suicide. But then her ghost prevails in the high school, taking revenge from each and everyone who did not appreciate their relationship.


5. Phone (2002) | Pon

A disturbing love story about possessions and ghosts, Phone is a story about a Journalist who is investigating a series of pedophilia incidents. She is successful in removing the mask of people involved but lands up getting threatened by various hoodlums. To get some peace back in her life, she changes her phone number. Her close friend also moves into her empty room with her husband and adopted a daughter. But one day the daughter picks up her phone and only hears a scream, a scream that leaves an effect on her which no one can explain.


6. A Tale of Two Sisters (2003) | Janghwa, Hongryeon

With an equally good American remake- The Uninvited, A Tale of Two Sisters is a twisted tale of love and dementia between two sisters. Su-mi returns to her home after a stint in a mental institution, but things have changed around the house. Her father has re-married and the only thing constant is her sister, Su-Yeon. They both resent the new woman in their life. While trying to carry on with their regular lives, some strange things start to happen around the house which leads to surprising revelations and shocking conclusion.


7. Into the Mirror (2003) | Geoul sokeuro

Wu-Young is an ex-detective now works in a humungous shopping center, which has re-opened, after being previously destroyed from a fire. But before the day of re-opening, some strange murders start to happen at the time. His detective instincts take over; Wu-Young starts handling the investigation, where he realizes that a ghost use mirrors as a gateway to the living world.


8. R Point (2004) | Arpointeu

A Korean soldier’s platoon gets a distress call from a jungle. They set off to save anyone who is stuck in unnatural conditions, only to be face to face with a curse which claims everyone.


9. Three… Extremes (2004) | Saam gaang yi

First let me explain the concept of the omnibus in films. Omnibus is a compilation of short movies which revolve around the same theme, may even relate to each other. Three Extremes is one such movie which is a collection of three short films; Dumplings: An aging actress wants to make her beauty immortal. She finds a woman who makes dumplings and uses regenerative powers. However, they contain a gruesome secret ingredient. Cut: A film producer and his wife are kidnapped by an Extra, who works at their film set. Now the director has to play his vile game, otherwise, his wife’s fingers will be chopped off every minute. Box: A young woman has a recurring dream; she is buried in a box in snow. Searching for her sister, she realizes that her dream and reality might be connected. READ 50+ Interesting Found Footage Horror Thriller Movies List  


10. Acacia (2003) | Akasia

Do-il and his wife, Mi-sook want to have a child of their own but are not able to conceive for a very long time. Finally giving into the destiny, they decide to adopt a six-year-old, Jin0Seong and bring him to their home. The young orphan is quite and only paints eerie pictures. But then one fine day, Mi-Sook becomes pregnant, which sets forth a string of supernatural events.


11. Wishing Stairs (2003) | Yeogo goedam 3: Yeowoo gyedan

Jin Seong is a high school student and an aspiring ballerina who wants get into world renowned art academy. To improve her chances into getting in, she works on a high school legend. If a student walks up the dormitory staircase and counts all 28 steps, a 29th Step appears. You can ask for any wish which will be granted. But then, her friend suffers a horrible accident; Jin Seong realizes that some wishes should never come true.


12. Ouija Board (2004) | Bunshinsaba

A movie using Ouija Board, now that’s some horror movie. Moving from Seoul to a small town, Yoo-jin is being tormented at her new school. To take revenge, she joins two other outcast friends and uses Ouija Board to cast a spell on the four biggest tormentors. She releases vengeful spirits of a mother-daughter, who were killed by the townsfolk 30 years ago. Once everyone gets to know the truth by witnessing the murder of Yoo-Jin’s tormentors, the townsfolk turn against her and get into the task of sending back spirits to their world.


13. Spider Forest (2004) | Geomi sup

TV Producer Kang Min wakes up in a forest and doesn’t know how he got there, What’s more, shocking is that he discovers his girlfriend slowly dying, along with a murdered body of a stranger. By pursuing a suspect, he gets into a car accident and wakes up in the hospital. There, he explains his situation to a friend-detective Choi, but soon, Kang becomes the lead suspect.


14. Dead Friend (2004) | Ryeong

An industrious student is suffering from amnesia but tries to live a normal life as much as she can. Her memory slowly comes back, and she gets to know that some of her friends have mysteriously drowned. She begins piecing together her past, revealing dark memories of the pact that was long made, which made her go through memory loss. She starts working on the puzzle so that no one else meets an ill fate.


15. The Red Shoes (2005) | Bunhongsin

Vicky Page, a world renowned ballerina in the making is torn between her dedication towards dance and her desire to love. She is being instructed by her instructor to make dance her life and priority over anything else. But she gets romantically involved with a young Composer Julian. Under great emotional stress, she now needs to choose between her career and love.


16. Antarctic Journal (2005) | Namgeuk-ilgi

During their expedition to Antarctic, Captain Choi-Hun-Dyung comes across a frozen journal in the snow. He passes the journal to Kim-Min-Jae to read and decode. But as they keep moving forward, they realize that there is no going back. And the treacherous events mentioned in the journal keep on happening in a series, one by one taking its toll on the team.


17. Voice (2005) | Yeogo goedam 4: Moksori

Young-eon, a top singer at her elementary school is murdered by music sheets while practicing her music. As bizarre as it sounds, no one can hear her or see her except her friend Seon-min. After Young-eon convinces her that something large is at play, both the friends get on the task to discover what exactly happened to Young-eon.